朝鲜展示打击美国军舰的能力

编辑:给力英语新闻 更新:2017年6月10日 作者:纽约时报(By MOTOKO RICH and JEYUP S. KWAAK)

6月1日,美国与日本的战舰在日本与韩国间的海上。周二,在这些战舰离去之后,朝鲜对该海域发射导弹。
6月1日,美国与日本的战舰在日本与韩国间的海上。周二,在这些战舰离去之后,朝鲜对该海域发射导弹。American and Japanese warships in the sea between Japan and Korea on June 1. On Thursday, North Korea fired missiles into the sea, days after the ships left.

东京——不久前,美国和日本的海军舰队还在日本和韩国间的水域向朝鲜展示武力,这些军舰离开没几天,朝鲜就试验发射了为打击这种军舰而设计的导弹

分析人士说,周四上午发射的看来是地对舰巡航导弹,意在表明朝鲜能够击退准备进攻朝鲜半岛的部队。

新近当选韩国总统的文在寅周四在首尔首次主持了国安会全体会议,讨论最近的这次导弹发射,这是自从他上个月当选以来,朝鲜进行的第五次导弹试验,也是今年的第十次。

据总统府青瓦台发表的声明,文在寅在会上说,“发射导弹只会招来国际社会的孤立和经济难关。”

由于前几次导弹试验,联合国安理会扩大了对平壤的制裁,此次发射发生该举动不到一周后。

发射也是在文在寅政府宣布已暂停部署美国反导弹防御系统不到24小时之后,部署名为末段高空防御系统(简称“萨德”)的目的是发现朝鲜的导弹、阻止它们击中目标。

中国领导人强烈反对部署萨德,暂停部署似乎是对中国做出的让步,也表现出韩国在对朝政策上与美国相左,批评人士曾暗示,暂停部署是一种信号,表明文在寅在朝鲜问题上将采取比其前任更温和的立场。

文在寅在周四的会上试图打消任何这种看法。他在国安会上说,他的政府“对于威胁国家安全和国民利益的行为,坚决不会让步和妥协”,这是自就职以来,他在朝鲜问题上发表的最强烈的言论。

一些分析人士说,文在寅把萨德系统交给耗时的环境评估程序、以及他最近批准派援助团体访问朝鲜的决定给人的印象是,文在寅在朝鲜问题上的做法好似朝鲜的核武器和导弹项目在他上次在政府任职之后的十年中没有进展。文在寅曾任前总统卢武铉的幕僚长,卢武铉属于自由派,在朝鲜问题上采取了比其保守派继任者更开放的政策。

朝鲜无视联合国制裁和国际社会谴责,一直在稳步地进行导弹试验。据首尔庆南大学远东研究所的分析师、韩国海军退役军官金东叶说,周四试验的看来是使用新型发射器的4联装导弹,该系统在平壤今年4月份的阅兵式上展示过。

导弹在飞行了约200公里后落入朝鲜半岛与日本之间的水域。美国航空母舰卡尔文森号(Carl Vinson)和罗纳德里根号(Ronald Reagan)、以及日本海上自卫队的驱逐舰最近曾在该海域活动,分??析人士说,朝鲜显然是在炫耀自己打击该区域中的军舰和军事基地的能力。

“如果美国想先发制人地打击朝鲜的话,会使用飞机和军舰,”位于韩国首都首尔的研究机构韩国防务与安全论坛的资深研究员杨旭(Yang Uk,音)说。“在最近的一系列试验中,朝鲜显示他们能够阻止这种打击。”

美国太平洋司令部没有马上对导弹发射发表评论,日本的反应也不强烈。虽然日本外相岸田文雄表示导弹试验“不可接受”,但日本政府并没有向朝鲜提出正式抗议。

分析人士说,朝鲜有意避免了在美国和日本军舰出现在该海域附近时试验这类导弹。“时间的选择很有意思,因为那些美国军舰和日本军舰已经离开了,”东京国家政策研究院安全与国际关系项目主任道下徳成说。“从某种意义来说,这不算太挑衅。”

Motoko Rich自东京、Jeyup S. Kwaak自韩国首尔报道。Su-hyun Lee自首尔对本文有报道贡献。

翻译:Cindy Hao

North Korea’s Antiship Missile Test Aims to Show It Can Repel Assault

TOKYO — Just days after a flotilla of American and Japanese warships left the sea between Japan and Korea, where they had been deployed in a show of force toward Pyongyang, North Korea tested missiles designed to hit such ships.

The launches Thursday morning of what appeared to be surface-to-ship cruise missiles were meant to demonstrate that the North could repel forces staging a strike on the Korean Peninsula, analysts said.

South Korea’s newly elected president, Moon Jae-in, convened his first national security meeting in Seoul on Thursday to discuss the latest missile tests, which were the fifth the North had conducted since he was elected last month, and the 10th this year.

“North Korea will only face further isolation from the international community and economic difficulties with its missile launches,” Mr. Moon said at the meeting, according to a statement released by the presidential Blue House.

The launches came less than a week after the United Nations Security Council expanded its sanctions against Pyongyang over previous missile tests.

They also came less than 24 hours after Mr. Moon’s administration said it had suspended the deployment of an American antimissile defense system — called Terminal High Altitude Area Defense, or Thaad — that is meant to detect North Korean missiles and prevent them from hitting their targets.

Critics had suggested that the suspension — which appeared to be a concession to China, whose leaders strongly objected to the Thaad system, and a break with the United States on policy toward North Korea — signaled that Mr. Moon was taking a much softer stance toward the North than his predecessors had.

Mr. Moon sought to dispel any such perception on Thursday. In his strongest language on the North since his inauguration, Mr. Moon told the National Security Council that his government “will not step back even one step or make compromises on national security or on the safety of our people.”

Some analysts say that with his decision to submit Thaad to a lengthy environmental review, as well as his recent approval of sending aid groups to visit North Korea, Mr. Moon is approaching North Korea as though its nuclear and missile development had not advanced in the decade since he last served in government. Mr. Moon was chief of staff to former President Roh Moo-hyun, a liberal who pursued a much more open policy toward the North than his conservative successors did.

The North has been steadily pursuing missile tests in defiance of United Nations sanctions and international condemnation. According to Kim Dong-yup, an analyst at the Institute for Far Eastern Studies at Kyungnam University in Seoul and a retired South Korean Navy commander, the tests Thursday appeared to be of four-canister missiles on new launchers that were displayed during a military parade in Pyongyang in April.

The missiles flew about 125 miles before landing in the sea between the Korean Peninsula and Japan. Two American aircraft carriers, the Carl Vinson and the Ronald Reagan, as well as Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force destroyers, had recently been in the area, and analysts said North Korea was clearly showing off its ability to hit warships as well as military bases in the region.

“If the U.S. were to pre-emptively strike North Korea, it would use aircraft and vessels,” said Yang Uk, a senior researcher at the Korea Defense and Security Forum, a research institute in Seoul, South Korea’s capital. “And in these last series of tests, North Korea is showing they can deter those strikes.”

The United States Pacific Command did not immediately comment on the launches, and Japan’s response was muted. Although Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida said the tests “cannot be accepted,” the Japanese government did not register a formal complaint with North Korea.

Analysts said the North Koreans had deliberately avoided testing these particular missiles while the American and Japanese warships were nearby. “The timing was interesting because these U.S. ships and Japanese ships have left,” said Narushige Michishita, director of the Security and International Studies Program at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies in Tokyo. “In a way, it wasn’t too provocative.”

Motoko Rich reported from Tokyo and Jeyup S. Kwaak from Seoul, South Korea. Su-hyun Lee contributed reporting from Seoul.